Open Access
Issue
E3S Web Conf.
Volume 309, 2021
3rd International Conference on Design and Manufacturing Aspects for Sustainable Energy (ICMED-ICMPC 2021)
Article Number 01038
Number of page(s) 11
DOI https://doi.org/10.1051/e3sconf/202130901038
Published online 07 October 2021
  1. S. Weston and M. B. Frieman, COVID-19: Knowns, Unknowns, and Questions, mSpher 5, no. 2(2020). [Google Scholar]
  2. J. Hiscott et al., The global impact of the coronavirus pandemic, Cytokine and Growth Factor Reviews, 53, pp. 1–9(2020). [Google Scholar]
  3. Z. Střížová, J. Bartůňková, and D. Smrž, “Can wearing face masks in public affect transmission route and viral load in covid-19 Central European Journal of Public Health, 28, no. 2. Czech National Institute of Public Health, pp. 161–162, (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  4. S. P. Kaur and V. Gupta, COVID-19 Vaccine: A comprehensive status report, Virus Research, vol. 288. Elsevier B.V., p. 198114 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  5. E. Dong, H. Du, and L. Gardner, An interactive web-based dashboard to track COVID-19 in real time, The Lancet Infectious Diseases 20, no. 5. Lancet Publishing Group, pp. 533–534 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  6. “Weekly epidemiological update - 29 December 2020.” https://www.who.int/publications/m/item/weekly-epidemiological-update---29-december-2020. [Google Scholar]
  7. A. C. Walls et al., Elicitation of Potent Neutralizing Antibody Responses by Designed Protein Nanoparticle Vaccines for SARS-CoV-2, Cell 183, no. 5, pp. 1367-1382.e17 (Nov. 2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  8. H. Naji, Comparative Analysis of COVID-19 Vaccines, 3, no. 1, pp. 118–120 (2021). [Google Scholar]
  9. Y. Dong, T. Dai, Y. Wei, L. Zhang, M. Zheng, and F. Zhou, A systematic review of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates, Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy 5, no. 1 (2020). [Google Scholar]
  10. Y. Chen, Q. Liu, and D. Guo, Emerging coronaviruses: Genome structure, replication, and pathogenesis, Journal of Medical Virology 92, no. 4. John Wiley and Sons Inc., pp. 418–423 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  11. A. Bukreyev et al., Mucosal immunisation of African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) with an attenuated parainfluenza virus expressing the SARS coronavirus spike protein for the prevention of SARS, Lancet 363, no. 9427, pp. 2122–2127 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  12. K. K. W. To et al., Temporal profiles of viral load in posterior oropharyngeal saliva samples and serum antibody responses during infection by SARS-CoV-2: an observational cohort study, The Lancet Infectious Diseases 20, no. 5, pp. 565–574 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  13. M. Hoffmann et al., SARS-CoV-2 Cell Entry Depends on ACE2 and TMPRSS2 and Is Blocked by a Clinically Proven Protease Inhibitor, Cell 181, no. 2, pp. 271-280.e8 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  14. X. Ou et al., Characterization of spike glycoprotein of SARS-CoV-2 on virus entry and its immune cross-reactivity with SARS-CoV, Nature Communications 11, no. 1 (2020). [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  15. P. Zhou et al., Erratum: Addendum: A pneumonia outbreak associated with a new coronavirus of probable bat origin, Nature 588, no. 7836. NLM (Medline), p. E6 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  16. Y. Wan, J. Shang, R. Graham, R. S. Baric, and F. Li, Receptor Recognition by the Novel Coronavirus from Wuhan: An Analysis Based on Decade-Long Structural Studies of SARS Coronavirus, Journal of Virology 94, no. 7 (2020). [Google Scholar]
  17. M. Letko, A. Marzi, and V. Munster, Functional assessment of cell entry and receptor usage for SARS-CoV-2 and other lineage B betacoronaviruses, Nature Microbiology 5, no. 4, pp. 562–569 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  18. Y. Cai et al., Distinct conformational states of SARS-CoV-2 spike protein, Science 369, no. 6511, pp. 1586–1592 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  19. H. Bisht et al., Severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus spike protein expressed by attenuated vaccinia virus protectively immunizes mice, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 101, no. 17, pp. 6641–6646 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  20. Y. ZY et al., A DNA vaccine induces SARS coronavirus neutralization and protective immunity in mice, Nature 428, no. 6982, (2004). [Google Scholar]
  21. M. JE et al., A SARS DNA vaccine induces neutralizing antibody and cellular immune responses in healthy adults in a Phase I clinical trial, Vaccine, vol. 26, no. 50, (2008). [Google Scholar]
  22. F. Amanat and F. Krammer, SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines: Status Report, Immunity 52, no. 4. Cell Press, pp. 583–589 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  23. Y. He, Y. Zhou, P. Siddiqui, and S. Jiang, Inactivated SARS-CoV vaccine elicits high titers of spike protein-specific antibodies that block receptor binding and virus entry, Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications 325, no. 2, pp. 445–452 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  24. J. Lan et al., Recombinant Receptor Binding Domain Protein Induces Partial Protective Immunity in Rhesus Macaques Against Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus Challenge, EBioMedicine 2, no. 10, pp. 1438–1446 (2015). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  25. J. Wang et al., The adjuvanticity of an o. volvulus-derived rov-ASP-1 protein in mice using sequential vaccinations and in non-human primates, PLoS ONE 7, no. 5 (2012). [Google Scholar]
  26. M. S. Suthar et al., Rapid Generation of Neutralizing Antibody Responses in COVID-19 Patients, Cell Reports Medicine 1, no. 3 (2020). [Google Scholar]
  27. Q. Gao et al., Development of an inactivated vaccine candidate for SARS-CoV-2, Science 369, no. 6499, pp. 77–81, (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  28. L. Ni et al., Detection of SARS-CoV-2-Specific Humoral and Cellular Immunity in COVID-19 Convalescent Individuals, Immunity 52, no. 6, pp. 971-977.e3 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  29. B. D. Quinlan et al., The SARS-CoV-2 receptor-binding domain elicits a potent neutralizing response without antibody-dependent enhancement, bioRxiv, p. 2020.04.10.036418 (2020). [Google Scholar]
  30. J. Hadjadj et al., Impaired type I interferon activity and inflammatory responses in severe COVID-19 patients, Science, vol. 369, no. 6504, pp. 718–724 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  31. D. Blanco-Melo et al., Imbalanced Host Response to SARS-CoV-2 Drives Development of COVID-19, Cell, vol. 181, no. 5, pp. 1036-1045.e9 (2020). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  32. W. Liu et al., Two-year prospective study of the humoral immune response of patients with severe acute respiratory syndrome, Journal of Infectious Diseases 193, no. 6, pp. 792–795 (2006). [Google Scholar]
  33. L. M. Gretebeck and K. Subbarao, Animal models for SARS and MERS coronaviruses, Current Opinion in Virology 13. Elsevier B.V., pp. 123–129 (2015). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  34. C. te Tseng et al., Immunization with SARS coronavirus vaccines leads to pulmonary immunopathology on challenge with the SARS virus, PLoS ONE, vol. 7, no. 4 (2012). [Google Scholar]
  35. A. Bukreyev et al., Mucosal immunisation of African green monkeys (Cercopithecus aethiops) with an attenuated parainfluenza virus expressing the SARS coronavirus spike protein for the prevention of SARS, Lancet 363, no. 9427, pp. 2122–2127 (2004). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  36. The different types of COVID-19 vaccines. https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/the-race-for-a-covid-19-vaccine-explained [Google Scholar]
  37. S. Plotkin, History of vaccination, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 111, no. 34. National Academy of Sciences, pp. 12283–12287 (2014) [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  38. I. Delrue, D. Verzele, A. Madder, and H. J. Nauwynck, Inactivated virus vaccines from chemistry to prophylaxis: merits, risks and challenges. [Google Scholar]
  39. F. Zepp, Principles of vaccine design-Lessons from nature, ”Vaccine 28, no. SUPPL. 3. Elsevier, pp. C14–C24 (2010). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  40. B. Ramezanpour, I. Haan, A. Osterhaus, and E. Claassen, Vector-based genetically modified vaccines: Exploiting Jenner’s legacy, Vaccine, vol. 34, no. 50, pp. 6436–6448, Dec. 2016, [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  41. H. Fausther-Bovendo and G. P. Kobinger, Pre-existing immunity against Ad vectors: Humoral, cellular, and innate response, what’s important Human Vaccines and Immunotherapeutics 10, no.10. Landes Bioscience, pp. 2875–2884 (2014) [Google Scholar]
  42. I. R. Humphreys and S. Sebastian, “=Novel viral vectors in infectious diseases, Immunology 153, no. 1. Blackwell Publishing Ltd, pp. 1–9 (2018). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  43. P. D. Minor, Live attenuated vaccines: Historical successes and current challenges, Virology 479–480. Academic Press Inc., pp. 379–392 (2015). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  44. Y. Dong, T. Dai, Y. Wei, L. Zhang, M. Zheng, and F. Zhou, A systematic review of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates, Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy 5, no. 1. Springer Nature (2020). [Google Scholar]
  45. A. Vartak and S. J. Sucheck, Recent advances in subunit vaccine carriers, Vaccines, 4, no. 2. MDPI AG (2016). [Google Scholar]
  46. I. P. Nascimento and L. C. C. Leite, Recombinant vaccines and the development of new vaccine strategies, Brazilian Journal of Medical and Biological Research 45, no. 12. Associação Brasileira de Divulgação Científica, pp. 1102–1111 (2012). [Google Scholar]
  47. J. J. Donnelly, B. Wahren, and M. A. Liu, DNA Vaccines: Progress and Challenges, The Journal of Immunology 175, no. 2, pp. 633–639 (2005). [Google Scholar]
  48. L. Li and N. Petrovsky, Molecular mechanisms for enhanced DNA vaccine immunogenicity, Expert Review of Vaccines 15, no. 3. Taylor and Francis Ltd, pp. 313–329 (2016). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  49. J. Ross, mRNA stability in mammalian cells, Microbiological Reviews 59, no. 3, pp. 423–450 (1995). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  50. C. Zhang, G. Maruggi, H. Shan, and J. Li, Advances in mRNA vaccines for infectious diseases, Frontiers in Immunology 10, no. MAR. Frontiers Media S.A., p. 594 (2019). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  51. Y. Dong, T. Dai, Y. Wei, L. Zhang, M. Zheng, and F. Zhou, A systematic review of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine candidates, Signal Transduction and Targeted Therapy 5, no. 1. Springer Nature (2020). [Google Scholar]
  52. S. P. Kaur and V. Gupta, COVID-19 Vaccine: A comprehensive status report, Virus Research 288. Elsevier B.V. (2020). [Google Scholar]
  53. Vaxzevria (previously COVID-19 Vaccine AstraZeneca) | European Medicines Agency.” https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/medicines/human/EPAR/vaxzevria-previously-covid-19-vaccine-astrazeneca [Google Scholar]
  54. Regulatory Decision Summary -Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 Vaccine - Health Canada.” https://covid-vaccine.canada.ca/info/regulatory-decision-summary-detailTwo.html?linkID=RDS00730 [Google Scholar]
  55. I. Jones and P. Roy, Sputnik V COVID-19 vaccine candidate appears safe and effective, The Lancet 397, no. 10275. Elsevier B.V., pp. 642–643 (2021). [Google Scholar]
  56. S. Xia et al., Safety and immunogenicity of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, BBIBP-CorV: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 1/2 trial, The Lancet Infectious Diseases, vol. 21, no. 1, pp. 39–51 (2021). [CrossRef] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  57. E. J. Anderson et al., Safety and Immunogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 mRNA-1273 Vaccine in Older Adults, New England Journal of Medicine, vol. 383, no. 25, pp. 2427–2438 (2020). [Google Scholar]
  58. K. E. Stephenson et al., Immunogenicity of the Ad26.COV2.S Vaccine for COVID-19, JAMA - Journal of the American Medical Association, vol. 325, no. 15, pp. 1535–1544 (2021). [Google Scholar]
  59. “Clinical Trial of Efficacy and Safety of Sinovac’s Adsorbed COVID-19 (Inactivated) Vaccine in Healthcare Professionals - ClinicalTrials.gov.” https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04456595 [Google Scholar]
  60. R. Ella et al., Safety and immunogenicity of an inactivated SARS-CoV-2 vaccine, BBV152: interim results from a double-blind, randomised, multicentre, phase 2 trial, and 3-month follow-up of a double-blind, randomised phase 1 trial, The Lancet Infectious Diseases (2021). [Google Scholar]
  61. “Study to Evaluate Efficacy, Immunogenicity and Safety of the Sputnik-Light - ClinicalTrials.gov.” https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04741061 [Google Scholar]
  62. F. C. Zhu et al., Immunogenicity and safety of a recombinant adenovirus type-5-vectored COVID-19 vaccine in healthy adults aged 18 years or older: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled, phase 2 trial, The Lancet 396, no. 10249, pp. 479–488 (2020). [Google Scholar]
  63. A. B. Ryzhikov et al., Immunogenicity and protectivity of the peptide candidate vaccine against SARS-CoV-2, Annals of the Russian academy of medical sciences. 76, no. 1, pp. 5–19 (2021). [Google Scholar]
  64. “A Phase III Clinical Trial to Determine the Safety and Efficacy of ZF2001 for Prevention of COVID-19) ClinicalTrials.gov.” https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04646590#wrapper [Google Scholar]
  65. N. al Kaabi et al., Effect of 2 Inactivated SARS-CoV-2 Vaccines on Symptomatic COVID-19 Infection in Adults: A Randomized Clinical Trial, JAMA (2021). [PubMed] [Google Scholar]
  66. “Russia approves its third COVID-19 vaccine, CoviVac Reuters.” https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-russia-vaccine-idUSKBN2AK07H. [Google Scholar]
  67. “A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy, Safety and Immunogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine (Vero Cells), Inactivated in Healthy Adults Aged 18 Years and Older (COVID-19)-ClinicalTrials.gov. https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04852705 [Google Scholar]
  68. “A Study to Evaluate the Efficacy, Safety and Immunogenicity of SARS-CoV-2 Vaccine (Vero Cells), Inactivated in Healthy Adults Aged 18 Years and Older (COVID-19) -ClinicalTrials.gov.” https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04852705. [Google Scholar]
  69. “The effects of virus variants on COVID-19 vaccines.” https://www.who.int/news-room/feature-stories/detail/the-effects-of-virus-variants-on-covid-19-vaccines. [Google Scholar]
  70. Klemeš, Jiří Jaromír, et al. “COVID-19 pandemics Stage II–Energy and environmental impacts of vaccination.” Renewable and Sustainable Energy Reviews 150 (2021). [Google Scholar]
  71. Intelsius News | The Environmental Impact of COVID-19. https://intelsius.com/news/the-environmental-impact-of-covid-19/ [Google Scholar]
  72. Phadke, Rachana, Ana Carla dos Santos Costa, Kartik Dapke, Shayon Ghosh, Shoaib Ahmad, Christos Tsagkaris, Sunidhi Raiya, M. Subha Maheswari, Mohammad Yasir Essar, and Shahzaib Ahmad. “Eco-friendly vaccination: Tackling an unforeseen adverse effect.” The Journal of Climate Change and Health 1 (2021). [Google Scholar]

Current usage metrics show cumulative count of Article Views (full-text article views including HTML views, PDF and ePub downloads, according to the available data) and Abstracts Views on Vision4Press platform.

Data correspond to usage on the plateform after 2015. The current usage metrics is available 48-96 hours after online publication and is updated daily on week days.

Initial download of the metrics may take a while.